Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War
August 12 - September 20, 2013

Hinds Community College Libraries are proud to host the national traveling exhibition Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, an exhibit organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association Public Programs Office and funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The exhibit is based on an exhibition of the same name developed by the National Constitution Center.

The exhibit will be hosted on the Hinds Raymond campus from August 12th to September 20th. The exhibition explores Lincoln’s historic reputation and how he used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

In addition to the traveling exhibition, the Raymond campus library will sponsor a series of lectures, music, dance, and readings that will accompany the exhibit.


Schedule of Events

Sept. 5

10 a.m. Opening Reception, Hinds CC President Dr. Clyde Muse

10:30 a.m. Hinds-Utica Campus Jubilee Singers, Civil War Spirituals, Dr. Bobby Cooper, Director

11:30 a.m. Dr. Ben Cloyd, Honors Director and History Instructor at Hinds CC, "Lincoln and the Problem of Civil War POWs"

1 p.m. Mississippi College Debate Team, Dr. Merle Zeigler, Director, "Have We Been Faithful to Lincoln's Legacy?"

Sept. 10

9 a.m. Brigadier General Parker Hills, Ret., Expert on Vicksburg and Raymond campaigns, "Lincoln and Grant: Perfect Strangers"

10 a.m. Ralph Miller, Musician

1 p.m. Maddrama, Jackson State University’s theatrical production company (readings, excerpts from diaries of soldiers), Dr. Mark Henderson, Director

Sept. 17

10 a.m. Hinds CC Montage Dancers, Tiffany Jefferson, Director

1 p.m. Shannon Thames, History Instructor & Dr. Dernoral Davis, Professor of History, Jackson State University, "The American Civil War and the Coming of African American Emancipation"

2 p.m. Garrad Lee, History Instructor at Hinds CC, "The Peculiar Effort: Abe Lincoln, John Brown, and the Political Realities of Emancipation"





 Dr. Clyde Muse

September 5, 2013, 10 a.m.
Opening Reception - President Clyde Muse
McLendon Library


Jubilee Singers 

September 5, 2013, 10:30 a.m.
Jubilee Singers, Civil War spirituals
Dr. Bobby Cooper, Director

The Hinds-Utica Campus Jubilee Singers was formed in 1921 by Dr. William H. Holtzclaw, founder of Utica Normal and Industrial Institute (which later became Utica Junior College and is now the Utica Campus of Hinds Community College). The group continues to perform throughout the United States and Europe.


Dr. Ben Cloyd 

September 5, 2013, 11:30 a.m.
Dr. Ben Cloyd
Honors Director and History Instructor at Hinds CC

 


  Dr. Merle Zeigler

September 5, 2013, 1 p.m.
Mississippi College Debate Team
Dr. Merle Zeigler, Director

The Mississippi College Speech & Debate Team have won numerous team and individual awards over the last 80 years in collegiate forensics.


Brig. Gen. Parker Hills, Ret. 

September 10, 2013, 9 a.m.
Brigadier General Parker Hills, Ret.

Brig. Gen. Parker Hills, Ret. served almost 32 years in the U.S. Army uniform in active and reserve components, and retired as a brigadier general, Mississippi Army National Guard in 2001. He has served as president of Friends of the Vicksburg Campaign and Historic Trail, president of Friends of Raymond, chair of the Mississippi Civil War Battlefield Commission, and is chair of the Mississippi Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission. He is the author of A Study in Warfighting: Nathan Bedford Forrest and the Battle of Brice’s Crossroads; co-author of the Vicksburg Campaign Driving Tour Guide; co-author with Edwin C. Bearss of Receding Tide: Vicksburg and Gettysburg; a contributor to Vicksburg: Mississippi Blitzkrieg; and author of Vicksburg: Art of Commemoration.


 Ralph Miller

September 10, 2013, 10 a.m.
Ralph Miller, Musician

Singer/songwriter Ralph Miller of Vicksburg is a 1984 Hinds alumnus who currently plays in local venues around Jackson, at restaurants and at private events. His music consists of ’60s, ‘70s, folk, pop and easy listening. In addition to his music, Miller spends much of his time advancing his photography skills, specializing in historical scenes around the state.


MADDRAMA (Making A Difference Doing Respectable And Meaningful Art) 

September 10, 2013, 1 p.m.
Maddrama
Dr. Mark Henderson, Director

MADDRAMA (Making A Difference Doing Respectable And Meaningful Art) was founded on the campus of Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi in 1998 by Mark G. Henderson and strives to promote excellence in the performing arts with an emphasis on people of color.


Montage Theatre of Dance 

September 17, 2013, 10 a.m.
Montage Dancers

Under the direction of Tiffany Jefferson in the Speech, Theatre and Dance Department at Hinds, the Montage Theatre of Dance is a multi-disciplinary dance theater company which infuses many genres of dance including ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop, modern, acrobatics and African to perform original, cutting-edge choreography. They have performed in Europe and in the U.S. at such notable places as Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. and the summer 2012 Olympics in London.


 Shannon Thames

September 17, 2013, 1 p.m.
Shannon Thames, History Instructor, Jackson State University
Dr. Dernoral Davis, Professor of History, Jackson State University

A Compton, California, native, Shannon Thames teaches History of Civilization, United States History and History of World War II at Jackson State University where he earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees in History in 2007 and 2008. His research interests are primarily in United States History, with emphasis in the African American historical experience as well as American Education and Military History. Currently, he is engaged in a research project focusing on 20th century African American migration.


Garrad Lee

September 17, 2013, 2 p.m.
Garrad Lee, History Instructor, Hinds CC

Garrad Lee teaches Western Civilization and African American History at Hinds's Academic/Technical Center in Jackson. He has B.A. degrees in Psychology (Mississippi State University) and Ethnic Studies (University of Colorado) and earned an M.A. in History at Jackson State University. When not instructing, Lee works in the Jackson music scene as a show promoter and record label owner. He also loves to put on panel discussions on music history (especially funk and hip hop) at academic conferences. Active in numerous social justice groups around town, Lee lives in the Fondren neighborhood in Jackson with his wife Catherine and their two dogs and one cat.

 


 

Exhibit Information

“Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” 

Image courtesy of Alusiv, IncImage courtesy of Alusiv, Inc.
 

“Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War,” examines how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

Overview of exhibition themes:

1. The Civil War as a Constitutional Crisis: In 1861 the issue of slavery precipitated a national crisis framed largely in terms of constitutional issues. The framers of the Constitution had left unanswered some basic questions about the nature of the federal Union they had created: Was the United States truly one nation, or was it a confederacy of sovereign and separate states? How could a country founded on the belief that “all men are created equal” tolerate slavery? In a national crisis, would civil liberties be secure? By 1860, these unresolved questions had become ticking time bombs, ready to explode. Abraham Lincoln’s election as the nation’s first anti-slavery president brought the nation to the brink of war. Lincoln used the tools the Constitution gave him to confront three intertwined issues of the Civil War—the secession of Southern states, slavery and wartime civil liberties.

2. Secession: By the time Lincoln took the constitutional oath of office as president, seven states had already seceded from the Union. Four more soon followed. Southern secessionists believed they had the right to withdraw their states’ ratification of the Constitution and dissolve their connection to the Union. Northerners, however, rejected this idea of “state sovereignty.” They believed that when the Constitution was ratified, a united people had established an indivisible nation. Lincoln believed that state secession was unconstitutional and undemocratic. At Lincoln’s inauguration, he promised that the government would not attack the South if the Union was not attacked. But he also warned that he had taken a solemn oath to “preserve, protect and defend” the Constitution. What Southerners heard that day were not words of moderation but a declaration of war.

Image courtesy of Alusiv, Inc
Image courtesy of Alusiv, Inc.

3. Slavery: Lincoln is widely acknowledged as one of America’s greatest presidents, but he was a controversial figure in his day and his historical reputation is contested today. Lincoln believed that slavery was immoral, but he shared many of the racial prejudices of his day. His policy preferences about slavery and abolition evolved over time. For much of his political career he favored gradual, compensated abolition of slavery and the colonization of freed slaves in South America or Africa. In the crucible of the Civil War, he came to believe that for the nation to survive, slavery had to end. The signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 served to abolish slavery in the United States.

4. Civil Liberties: Lincoln claimed extraordinary powers in order to control the chaos of dissent during the Civil War. He suspended the writ of habeas corpus—the provision in the Constitution that protects citizens against arbitrary arrests. By 1863, thousands of civilians had been detained, mostly suspected draft dodgers and deserters and Confederate sympathizers in the Border States and the South. For these actions, Lincoln was denounced as a tyrant by his political foes. He struggled throughout the war to find the appropriate balance between national security and individual rights.

 
 
Image courtesy of Alusiv, Inc
Image courtesy of Alusiv, Inc. 

5. Legacy: Lincoln’s fight to save the Union transformed the nation and the Constitution. Lincoln’s presidency left a legacy of ideals for our nation to live up to—equality, freedom and democracy. The powerful words of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address sought to transmit these ideals into future generations. The exhibition ends by asking visitors whether we as a nation have been faithful to this legacy.


Directions To Raymond Campus

From East Jackson:

Map from Mapquest

Campus Map

Take I-20 West toward Vicksburg. Exit onto MS-18 W via EXIT 40A toward Raymond. Drive about 8 miles. You will come to a red light with a street sign that says “E. Main St.” Turn right on to Main. Campus address is 501 W MAIN ST. Raymond, MS

The street curves past Sonic and Dollar General. Then you will come to a four way stop. You will see the campus across and to the right. Turn right and get into the left lane.

Pass the football stadium (on the left), turn left (there are two different entrances so if you miss one, you can catch the next one – on the map, I have highlighted the 2nd entrance

The road will wind around the Vashti Underwood Muse Band Hall. At that stop sign, turn left and go 50 yards or so and turn right into a parking lot. The Brooks Theatre is now on your right and the Student Union is the big building in front and to the left. The library is behind the Student Union. You can park close to the Student Union. Take the sidewalk on the right of the Union then veer left between the buildings. The entrance to the library is in the middle of the building.

From Vicksburg

Directions from Mapquest

Campus Map

Take I-20 East toward Jackson. Take the US-80 E/Clinton-Raymond Rd exit, EXIT 35.

Turn right onto Clinton-Raymond Rd.

After passing a fork in the road in which you will veer left (veering right takes you to downtown Raymond), you will see Hinds CC on the right.  Before you get to the football stadium (on the right), turn right (there are two different entrances so if you miss one, you can catch the next one – on the map, I have highlighted the 1st entrance). 

The road will wind around the Vashti Underwood Muse Band Hall.  At that stop sign, turn left and go 50 yards or so and turn right into a parking lot.  The Brooks Theatre is now on your right and the Student Union is the big building in front and to the left.  The library is behind the Student Union.  You can park close to the Student Union.  Take the sidewalk on the right of the Union then veer left between the buildings.  The entrance to the library is in the middle of the building.

Info for Teachers: